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Posts tagged ‘power’

Thought of the outside

Foucault contra Agamben
by / RP 175 (Sep/Oct 2012) / Article

It is gladly believed that a culture is more attached to its values than to its forms, that these can easily be modified, abandoned, taken up again; that only meaning is deeply rooted. This is to misunderstand … that people cling more to ways of seeing, saying, doing, and thinking, than to what they see, what they think, say or do… In the twentieth century things have taken an unusual […]


The poetry and prose of the Russian elections

by / RP 173 (May/Jun 2012) / Commentary

Between 10 December 2011, the day of the first mass protest against fraud in the recently held Russian parliamentary elections, and 4 March 2012, the day of the presidential vote, Moscow was a transformed place. The suffocating atmosphere of Putin’s rule was disturbed as if by a sudden breath of fresh air. People came onto the streets en masse, with demonstrations in Moscow organized by the opposition attracting up to […]


Noam Chomsky

Freedom and power
by and / RP 172 (Mar/Apr 2012) / Interview

Peter Hallward I’d like to start by asking you about some of your basic philosophical principles, starting with your understanding of human freedom and creativity. In the modern European tradition I’m most familiar with, freedom is a dominant philosophical theme from Descartes through Rousseau to Kant. With Kant we have an affirmation of absolute freedom from all external causation, but it remains a relatively abstract affair, a matter of ‘pure […]


Lenin and Gandhi

A missed encounter?
by / RP 172 (Mar/Apr 2012) / Article

The theme I shall address today has all the trappings of an academic exercise.* Still, I would like to attempt to show how it intersects with several major historical, epistemological and ultimately political questions. As a basis for the discussion, I will posit that Lenin and Gandhi are the two greatest figures among revolutionary theorist–practitioners of the first half of the twentieth century, and that their similarities and contrasts constitute […]


Also Sprach Zapata

Philosophy and resistance
by / RP 171 (Jan/Feb 2012) / Article

Each strives by physical force to compel the other to submit to his will: each endeavours to throw hisadversary, and thus render him incapable of further resistance. (Clausewitz, On War, 1832) Receive our truth in your dancing heart. Zapatalives, also and for always in these lands. (Clandestine Indigenous Revolutionary Committee ZNLA, ‘Votan-Zapata or Five Hundred Years of History’, 1994) 2011 may well be remembered as the year of resistance.* The uprisings […]


Demonomics

Leibniz and the antinomy of modern power
by / RP 168 (Jul/Aug 2011) / Article

The critical ethos that stands behind much of the most impressive and important work on modern forms of power seems to have constructed its own prison. A free and open concept of power – the concept that has guided so many enlightening histories of the present – has revealed itself as yet another technology of foreclosure. Two apparently opposed approaches to power in political philosophy – political theology and biopower […]


The gender apparatus

Torture and national manhood in the US ‘war on terror’
by / RP 168 (Jul/Aug 2011) / Article

Feminist protest against US torture practices, including outcries over the use of sex, sexuality and sexual identity in the torture of prisoners at US detention sites from Guantánamo to Abu Ghraib, have understandably tended to focus on what the abuse destroys – the victim and his or her community. Here, though, I ask what the torture produces. Borrowing and revising a question that Catharine MacKinnon posed about genocide (‘What is […]


History (Problem with)

From structure to rhizome: transdisciplinarity in French thought (2)
by / RP 167 (May/Jun 2011) / Article

If the philosopher’s role is to forge concepts, the historian’s function is to provide proof of their pertinence. However, this presupposes that the historian uses the concept correctly, taking into consideration the conditions that formed it. A truly transdisciplinary approach makes this possible, thanks to its rigorous method, whereas an interdisciplinary approach is merely a juxtaposition of approaches drawn from various disciplines. In his inaugural lecture at the Collège de France […]


Elasticity of demand

Reflections on 'The Wire'
by / RP 154 (Mar/Apr 2009) / Article


The materiality of the immaterial: Foucault, against the return of idealisms and new vitalisms

Dossier: Art and Immaterial Labour
by / RP 149 (May/Jun 2008) / Article


(T)error and poetry

Dossier: Art and Immaterial Labour
by / RP 149 (May/Jun 2008) / Article


Bodies and power, revisited

by / RP 114 (Jul/Aug 2002) / Article


Continuous crisis

Historical action and passion in Antonio Negri’s Insurgencies
by / RP 112 (Mar/Apr 2002) / Article


The fate of the body politic

by / RP 108 (Jul/Aug 2001) / Article


The space of flows and timeless time

Manuel Castells’s The Information Age
by / RP 097 (Sep/Oct 1999) / Article


Writing as a man

Levinas and the phenomenology of Eros
by / RP 087 (Jan/Feb 1998) / Article


Foucault’s Aesthetics of Existence

by / RP 063 (Spring 1993) / Article


Feminism, Humanism and Postmodernism

by / RP 055 (Summer 1990) / Article


Nietzsche: A Radical Challenge To Political Theory?

by / RP 054 (Spring 1990) / Article

Only if mankind possessed a universally recognised goal would it be possible to propose ‘thus and thus is the right course of action’: for the present there exists no such goal. It is thus irrational and trivial to impose the demands of morality upon mankind. – To recommend a goal to mankind is something quite different: the goal is then thought of as something which lies in our discretion; supposing […]


Socialism, Feminism and Men

by / RP 053 (Autumn 1989) / Article