Lost minds

Our illnesses are mostly political illnesses. Peter Weiss1In Memoirs of a Revolutionary Victor Serge describes the first decade of Soviet rule as displaying ‘the obscure early stages of a psychosis’, the symptoms of which became increasingly pronounced as time wore on and the defeats and corpses piled ever higher. The experience of living through the […]

The Eupsychian Impulse

The Eupsychian Impulse Psychoanalysis and Left politics since ’68 Barry Richards My purpose here is to offer some reflections on the part flayed by psychoanalysis in Left politics in Britain since 1968. I will attempt a broad and critical characterisation of the major uses to which psychoanalytic theory has been put in political discourse during […]

Discussion: Leninism versus proletarian self-emancipation; Laing’s social philosophy; The Trivialily of Althusser

Discussion Leninism versus proletarian self-emancipation Norman Geras argues (RP6, pp20-22) convincingly that Marx’s theory of socialist revolution is grounded on the fundamental principle that ‘the emancipation of the working class must be the work of the working class itself’. Marx held to this view throughout his entire forty years of socialist political activity, and it […]

Mental Illness as a Moral Concept

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••• mEDTAllllDESS AS A mORAL [OD[EPT ………………………. SEAnSAVERS (, The concept of mental illness has been the subject of heated controversy in recent years; and this debate has caught the attention of a wide public. The reason for this is not simply that the debate has sometimes been conducted in heated terms; but, more importantly, […]

A Critique of R. D. Laing’s Social Philosophy (Part 1)

••••••••••••••••••••••••• a Eritique 01 R.D.lAln6’S SO[IAL PHILOSOPHV part 1 • JOE WARRID&TOD ••••••••••••••••••••••• •• Introduction No-one is an expert on the question as to what madness is, nor on its significance. This is a baffling yet fundamental field not just in theory but in relation to our very lives. Men like R D Laing have […]

Sanity, Madness and the Problem of Knowledge

grasp Marx’s thought ‘did not succeed in the r intentions,’ above all because they ‘approached Marx ones dely,’ and deliberately ‘isolated the economist, the ph losopher, or the historian,’ etc. Of course there is an element of truth in these remarks, since all scientific work is necessari ly partial and needs to be complemented by […]