The history of cinema, as experience

…his relationship to German culture, by linking both of them to his idea of cinema. He places cinema, through the force of its ‘eloquent and profound’ images, alongside philosophy, politics and literature. Godard is probably thinking here of the ‘progressive universal poetry’ and the theory of the fragment in the first German Romantic movement. Images can do without words, for they are filled with special kinds of expressive force and historicity….

Transcendental cinema

…we who make cinema; it is the world which looks to us like a bad film. [64] Cinema For Deleuze cinema is the art form that has the most potential to dramatize the multiple ways of inhabiting the modern form of time. Cinema permits a montage of temporal relays quite different from, but based on the same temporal syntheses as, the experience of human beings. [65] However, in an interview Deleuze comments that the real reason he felt drawn to writing…

Late style and contrapuntal histories

…catastrophic wars of the twentieth century, as well as the years when the cinema (or cinematograph) first came into existence. If Godard’s post-1979 works are less overtly political than those of the late 1960s and early 1970s – particularly the agit-prop style of his films produced under the moniker Groupe Dziga Vertov (1969-1970) – they nonetheless remain politically charged in their insistence on the idea of cinema, and art more generally, as…

People exposed, people as extras

…the names of ancient gods). The figurants or ‘extras’ are the night of the cinema when cinema strives to be an art that makes stars shine. To a certain extent, they are to the world of shows what the miserable wretches – the misérables – were to the industrial world of Victor Hugo’s time. The figurants or ‘extras’ would therefore represent something like an accursed share of the high art – and of the huge industry – of cinema. They are situated at…

Faust on film

…the present as one surreal possibility. Our history is the history of the cinematic; this insight occurs to us at the moment of the decline of cinema’s existing narrative form, with the advent of the digital image and the new vistas demanded by digital, HD and 3D. [79] In this context, Goethe’s phantasmagoric visualization may be considered the primal history of cinema itself. The play dramatizes its own temporality in a phantasmagoric procession…

Art, documentary and the essay film

…sthetic, which was then matched by Shub. Shub’s was seen to be properly a ‘cinema of fact’. What is a cinematic fact? This was a question that was asked and answered in relation to Shub’s projects. It was a debate that took place in the pages of the journal Novyi Lef, where one contributor, Sergei Tretyakov, opined that ‘the degree of the deformation of the material out of which the film is composed’ was tantamount to ‘the random personal factor i…

The ship sails on

…a great unnamed cast of ilm theorists) and the ive ways in which he thinks cinema. Thus we return to cinema as semblance of the real (Bazin), cinema as making time visible (Deleuze), but then also cinema as the democratization of the other arts, cinema as on the border between art and non-art, and inally cinema as afording what Badiou calls ‘ethical genres, genres that are addressed to humanity so as to ofer it a moral mythology’. What follows in…

Gilles Deleuze and the redemption from interest

…iven in the cinema. And yet they are cinemaʼs concepts, not theories about cinemaʼ (Cinema 2: The Time-Image (hereafter C2), trans. Hugh Tomlinson and Barbara Habberjam, University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis, 1989, p. 280, my emphasis). FC, pp. 16–17. FC, p. 53. FC, pp. 53, 54; cf. p. 59. FC, p. 54. ʻThe task of philosophy when it creates concepts, entities, is always to extract an event from things and beingsʼ ([with Félix Guattari] What is…

Television Literacy

…Technique and Film Acting, New York, Grove. Metz, C. (1974b) Language and Cinema, The Hague, Mouton. Metz, C. (1982) Psychoanalysis and Cinema: The Imaginary Signijier, London, MacMillan. Resnick, D. P. and Resnick, L. B. (1977) ‘The nature of literacy: an historical exploration’, Harvard Educational Review, Vo!. 47, No. 3, pp. 370-85. Morley, D. (1980) The NATIONWIDE Audience, London, British Film Institute, 1980. Salomon, G. (1979) Interaction…

Playing the code

…olitical realities into film has a complicated track record. For mainstream cinema generally deals with problems of politics not, in fact, by preventing them, but by sublimating them. Fifty years ago Hitchcock showed the plodding, unfeeling machinations of the criminal justice system in his film The Wrong Man. Today the police are not removed from the crime film genre, far from it, but their micromovements of bureaucratic command and control are gone…

Here comes the new

…s, p. 20; Buck-Morss, ‘Envisioning Capital’, p. 437. 38. ^ Gilles Deleuze, Cinema 1: The Movement-Image, trans. Hugh Tomlinson and Barbara Habberjam, Continuum, London and New York, 2005, pp. 150–51; Bazin, ‘The Western’, p. 147. 39. ^ Deleuze, Cinema 1, p. 152. 40. ^ The gendering of entrepreneurship – in the figure of Alma Garrett, who takes over her murdered husband’s unexpectedly lucrative gold mine, on the one hand, and the Madame, Joanie Stu…

Elasticity of demand

…diegetic and segmentary character may be described as either novelistic or cinematic, its televisual character should not for that reason be ignored. Indeed, it has been suggested that the segmentary quality of the television moving image is definitive of its form: originally anchored in domesticity, distraction, and the predominance of the glance over the cinematic gaze. Interrupted viewing (by adverts, for example) is constitutively inscribed in…

Flux and flurry

…in the sense of Walter Benjamin’s ‘optical unconscious’ of photography and cinema, a new mode of seeing beyond seeing, using the segmenting powers of the camera and cinematic technology on a dissected image world that must be broken down in order to be made up again. As such animation might be not just the illusion of movement but also the movement of illusion. Frozen social relations are warmed into life; the rigid surface unthaws. Animation has…

Interview: Forgetting Vietnam

…because they go by subject. But if, instead of content, they were to go by cinematic concerns, they wouldn’t program them together. For me, lumping them together would make it impossible for the viewer to open up and take in their autonomy and integrity as film. I mention all this to give you the wider context required to respond to your question about the complex relation between forgetting and remembering. In the making of Forgetting Vietnam one…

Theatre and the public

…A National Theatre can be imagined and indeed effectuated, but a National Cinema? Cinema is international, global, but private, Badiou continues; it bears no relation to the state. However, if there have been times when theatre has literally been summoned in and out of existence by royal command, every theatre performance today still carries a sense of being a ‘command performance’. According to Badiou, the theatre (small ‘t’) is the art of the s…

Ontogenetic machinery

…e. The construction of pane and mirror could be read as an allegory of the cinematic situation. The clerk and Hulot cannot interact physically, but only look, such as we can only look at them without being able to reach them. This has been studied at length by theories of cinema. But here we have not only to deal with allegory and significance, but with physical presence and operation. As object of physical involvement, the moving image is integra…

From stillness to movement and back

…ilities – find broad distribution in a variety of conventional and arthouse cinemas. Many audiences and critics take these films to heart, but they remain foreign, essentially strange within the context of usual cinema output because of their lack of stars and their absence of hooks to the outside world of gossip, fashion and journalistic discussions of contemporary morality and how ʻweʼ should live our lives. * This commentary was developed from a…

Revolutionary commemoration

…utube.com/watch?v=1SmuBMANFKw. ^ GV Aleksandrov, Epokha i kino [ Epoch and Cinema ] (Moscow: Izdatel’stvo politicheskoi literaturi, 1983), 104. ^ The first objection was voiced by Sergei Tret’iakov, the second and third by Osip Brik, see Yuri Tsivian, ‘Eisenstein and Russian Symbolist Culture: an Unknown Script of October’ in Eisenstein Rediscovered, ed. Ian Christie and Richard Taylor (New York, NY: Routledge, 2005), 75–104, 89. Thanks to Alex Fl…

Media and Images

…ce, or rather a particular conjunction of the collective with the private. Cinemagoing is both a collective matter and an intensely individualised matter, and represents a transition from essentially collective to essentially privatistic pursuits. As such, films at the peak of the cinema’s image-making power displayed a number of techniques and practices for coping with both ends of the transition. Films developed as a unique blend of the reali~ti…

Becoming everyone

…docudrama, Fertile Memory, as follows: This film turned the PLO’s militant cinema upsidedown. It demonstrated that it is more important to show the thinking that leads to the political slogan than the expression of this slogan that is political discourse. For the first time, we could see Palestinian women in their private environment, all by themselves. Their memory was becoming subject, since they were themselves the subjects of their people’s dr…

Global homocapitalism

…texts depicting the lives of the super elite are avidly consumed by Indian cinemagoers of all classes in a range of affective modes including identification, aspiration and escapism. In this sense, what the queer critics were calling ‘homonormativity’ was also deeply ‘authentic’, conforming as it did to the canons of mainstream Bollywood cinema. The second representation, described on social media as India’s first lesbian advertisement, was produc…