The history of cinema, as experience

…ke an aesthetics of form and material and from it develop a conception of history making it possible to think of cinema as art, Godard seems to recognize the inspiration behind his own Histoire(s). Starting in the early 1970s, probably under the influence of his discovery of electronic image technologies, Godard also became interested in thinking about history in a filmic form. Like Frampton, he sought to develop from within cinema a form equival…

Transcendental cinema

Transcendental cinema Deleuze, time and modernity Christian kerslake In the preface to the English edition of Cinema 2, Deleuze claims that cinema is a repetition, in speededup form, of an experience that has already occurred in the history of philosophy. [1] This notion of repetition recalls the biological notion of the ʻrecapitulationʼ of phylogeny in ontogeny: individual development recapitulates, or replays in speeded-up form, the developm…

Late style and contrapuntal histories

…techniques, a central theme that pervades almost all of this work is what Godard views as the coming to pass of cinema, or, more specifically, a certain idea and history of cinema – a subject most notably explored in his eight-part video project Histoire(s) du cinéma [ (Hi)stories of Cinema ] (1988-1998). As Godard states in his long interview about Histoire(s) with Yousseff Ishaghour for Trafic in 1998: We can say broadly that a certain idea o…

People exposed, people as extras

…he image and not cut off from the real, since it linked – for the long duration of the social development of the cinema – the workers with the managers or the customers from the same nascent industry. In what remains perhaps his most fascinating work, Jean Louis Schefer sketched a poetics and almost a metapsychology of this ‘imaginary man’ by calling him ordinary man, the ‘man without qualities’ of the cinema. And where our solitude in front of t…

Faust on film

…his final essays, specifically the Faustian motifs of the last theses On the Concept of History. Drawing on the cinematic afterlife of Goethe’s Faust, this article utilizes Benjamin’s own pragmatic conception of history to argue that its importance for Benjamin resides in the articulation of a cinematic ontology that comes increasingly to underpin his own mature philosophy. literary-historical pragmatism The emergence of the modern academic disc…

Michel Foucault

ontology, nor with the formulation of a general philosophy. They are concerned with such topics as politics, aesthetics, literature, anthropology, linguistics, and are often very specific’ in content. They often discuss a particular political event or situation, a particular artist or the theories of a specific anthropologist and many are journalistic in form. However, for all their concreteness, these writings – even newspaper art…

Art, documentary and the essay film

…sentation of this given life indiscriminately. The puddle, this unworthy spillage, is redeemed in the low art of cinema. Both cinema and puddle are elevated from the ground. The upper world is brought down to earth as image. Fixed for ever – or for as long as the film strip exists – is a wobble of movement, which comes to stand in for what is life, because it is life captured, being nature’s vitality. It is a life that is possessed by the wind an…

The ship sails on

…at it internalizes in the very structure of its composition. John kraniauskas And the ship sails onAlain Badiou, Cinema, Polity, Cambridge, 2013. 320 pp., £55.00 hb., £17.99 pb., 978 0 74565 567 3 hb., 978 0 74565 568 0 pb. To call a book simply Cinema is to frame its contents as a contribution to the theorization of cinema, and thus, for a certain readership, to identify it as something other than ilm criticism. It is, in other words, to announc…

Ontogenetic machinery

…s the main object of the whole sequence. The construction of pane and mirror could be read as an allegory of the cinematic situation. The clerk and Hulot cannot interact physically, but only look, such as we can only look at them without being able to reach them. This has been studied at length by theories of cinema. But here we have not only to deal with allegory and significance, but with physical presence and operation. As object of physical i…

Gilles Deleuze and the redemption from interest

…xhaustively detailed of Deleuzeʼs artistic examples is the becoming-immediate of modern film described in the two Cinema books. Deleuze aims to show that cinema duplicates the path taken by modern philosophy beginning with Kant,138 from Given to Real – from an indirect, mediate presentation of time through relative, positioned movements, to a direct, immediate presentation of time based on an absolute movement constitutive of all possible positio…

From stillness to movement and back

…dren, though childlike in their sensibilities – find broad distribution in a variety of conventional and arthouse cinemas. Many audiences and critics take these films to heart, but they remain foreign, essentially strange within the context of usual cinema output because of their lack of stars and their absence of hooks to the outside world of gossip, fashion and journalistic discussions of contemporary morality and how ʻweʼ should live our lives….

Television Literacy

…hin film: and in developing the film language analogy beyond this point, Metz (1974b) acknowledges the fact that cinema uses a diversity of codes, which together constitute the specificity of the medium. Thus, as well as ‘iconic’ codes, there are also auditory codes, and codes which govern the combination of images and sounds. Within this revised perspective, cinema comes to be seen as a meeting place of multiple codes (cf. Kjorup, 1…

Playing the code

Playing the code Allegories of control in Civilization Alexander R. Galloway With the progressive arrival of new media over the last century or so there appears a sort of lag time, call it the ʻthirty-year ruleʼ, starting from the invention of a medium and ending at its ascent to proper and widespread functioning in culture at large. This can be said of film, from its birth at the turn of the last century up to the blossoming of classical film fo…

Chris Marker, 1921–2012

Obituaries Future anterior Chris Marker, 1921–2012 Should we start with the death in Paris, on 29 July 2012, at the age of 91? Or with the birth, on the same day in 1921 in Ulan Bator (or Belleville, or Neuillysur-Seine, depending on who you ask)? We could start, perhaps, with the names, like a proper obituary or a wanted poster: Christian François Bouche-Villeneuve, alias Sandor Krasna, alias Hayao Yamaneko, alias Kosinski, alias Guillaume-en-…

Here comes the new

…), 87. 37. ^ Pippin, Hollywood Westerns, p. 20; Buck-Morss, ‘Envisioning Capital’, p. 437. 38. ^ Gilles Deleuze, Cinema 1: The Movement-Image, trans. Hugh Tomlinson and Barbara Habberjam, Continuum, London and New York, 2005, pp. 150–51; Bazin, ‘The Western’, p. 147. 39. ^ Deleuze, Cinema 1, p. 152. 40. ^ The gendering of entrepreneurship – in the figure of Alma Garrett, who takes over her murdered husband’s unexpectedly lucrative gold mine, on t…

Elasticity of demand

…that of action. But if The Wire’s polydiegetic and segmentary character may be described as either novelistic or cinematic, its televisual character should not for that reason be ignored. Indeed, it has been suggested that the segmentary quality of the television moving image is definitive of its form: originally anchored in domesticity, distraction, and the predominance of the glance over the cinematic gaze. Interrupted viewing (by adverts, for…

Flux and flurry

…ms available to knowledge, conscious, in the sense of Walter Benjamin’s ‘optical unconscious’ of photography and cinema, a new mode of seeing beyond seeing, using the segmenting powers of the camera and cinematic technology on a dissected image world that must be broken down in order to be made up again. As such animation might be not just the illusion of movement but also the movement of illusion. Frozen social relations are warmed into life; th…

Theatre and the public

…ounding the arts, theatre does not in fact address a public; rather, it addresses a spectator (RT 188). Only the cinema, the art of capital, requires a public: anonymous, general, a whole whose parts are infinitely replaceable. A National Theatre can be imagined and indeed effectuated, but a National Cinema? Cinema is international, global, but private, Badiou continues; it bears no relation to the state. However, if there have been times when th…

Interview: Forgetting Vietnam

Trinh T. Minh-ha teaches in the University of California, Berkeley’s departments of Rhetoric, and Gender and Women’s Studies. Born in Hanoi in 1952, Trinh emigrated to the United States in 1970 where she studied musical composition, ethnomusicology and French literature, completing her PhD dissertation in 1977 under the title: Un Art sans Oeuvre: l’Anonymat dans les Arts Contemporains [An Art Without Oeuvre: Anonymity in Contemporary Arts]. Sinc…

Media and Images

…possible. Thus colour-tinting was done long before present-day colour processing was invented; the invention of cinematography occurred at least two decades after the first experimentation with moving pictures; cinematographic sound had been experimented with in the 1890s – it took nearly thirty years before a synchronized system was invented; and television was conceived in various systems by Americans, Britons and Russians during the 192…

Revolutionary commemoration

…hey seemed too heroic; they were insufficiently engaged in drunken carousing, etc. 47 October featured the first cinematic portrayal of Lenin by an actor, which also met with strong objections. Vladimir Mayakovsky wrote to Eisenstein to express his outrage at the idea of a ‘counterfeit Lenin’, 48 while Osip Brik referred to it as a ‘forgery’. 49 (Although it would not be long before cinematic Lenin replicas proliferated, Soviet theatres inserted…