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10 Contents Page

Conlenls

Local sellers

SWANSEA: EXAMINATION BLUES

1

JOSEPH DIETZGEN
Adam Buick

3

FREEDOM OF SPEECH AND ACADEMIC FREEDOM
Roy Edgley

9

ANTI-MORALISM
Pete Binns

19

NOTES:

David Lamb: Reductionism
Trevor Pateman: Re-reading Hare
DISCUSSION:

Edmund B~ke: wittgenstein’s ConservatTsm
Ian Craib: Ranciere and Ai thusser
D.A. Wilson: Socialist Humanism

22
26
27
28

29
31

LETl’ERS
REVIEWS:

Sean Sayers: Philosophy in China
Russell Keat: Habermas
Christopher Norris: Russian semiology
Teifion Davies: Radical Psychology
Trevor Pateman: writings of Passage
Liz Peretz: What School is for
Jean McCrindle: Women’s History
NEWS
Chile, Yugoslavia, Counter-course
LETl’~R

TO READERS

32
34
36
38
39

40
40
42

45

This issue was edited by Jonathan Ree (co-ordinater
Alison Assiter,. Chris Arthur, T;d Benton,
Mike Dawney Michael Erben, Denis Gleeson. John
Mepham, Sean Sayers, Tony Skillen, Kate Soper,
Janet Vaux.Pet.er Binns
Production and paste up: Alison Assiter,
Mike Dawney, Jonathan Ree, Janet Vaux
TYped by Jo Foster and Barbara Coysh
Design by Andrew Fall
Publicity by Richard Norman, Sean Sayers
Distribution by Michael Erben, John Krige, John
Mepham, Kate Soper
Finances overseen by John Krige

The

BATH – B.• G. Reeves
School of Humanities & Social Studies,
The University
BELFAST – Bob Eccleshall
Dept. of Political Science, Queens University
BRIGHTON – Alison Assiter
Arts Bldg, University of Sussex
BRISTOL – Keith Graham
Dept. of Philosophy, The University
CAMSRIDGE – J. Allier
Homerton College of Education
CANTERBURY – Richard Norman
Darwin College, University of Kent
CARDIFF – K.A. Markham
APPS, U.W. Inst. of Science & Technology
– B. Wilkins
Dept. of Philosophy, University College
COLCHESTER – Ted Benton
Dept. of Sociology, University of Essex
CORK – John Daly
Students Union, U~iversity College
C~VENTRY – Pete Binns
School of Philosophy, University of Warwick
EDINBURGH S.R.C. Shop David Hume Tower
GLASGOW – D. Ruben
Logic Dept., The University
KEELE – Dennis Gleeson
Dept. of Education, The University
LAMPETER – H.M. Jones
Philosophy Dept. St David’s College
LANCASTER – Howard Feather
Cartmel College, The University
LEEDS – Hugo Meynell
Dept. of Philosophy, The University
LEICESTER – N. Pittard
Mary Gee Houses, The University.

LONDON – Michael Erben, Dept. of Sociology,
Garnett College
– Mike Dawney, Middlesex Poly at Hornsey
Claud Pehrson~
at Enfield
– Jonathon Ree
at Hendon
– Alison Assiter, North London Poly at
P~ince of Wales Road
NORWICH – Nick Everitt
School of Social Studies, University of East
Anglia
OXFORD – Paul O’Flinn
Dept. of Literature & Art, Oxford Poly
– George Wootton, Wadham College
SOUTHAMPTON – D. Lamb
17 Southdene Road, Chandlers Form
SWANSEA – D. Sheriff
Philoso?hy Dept., The University

ical Philoso phy a.-oap

The Raarcal Philosophy Group grew out of the convergence of two currents which had been largely
formed by the student movement of the 1960s – on the one hand, discontent, especially among students,
with the sterile and complacent philosophy taught in British uniyersities and c’olleges, on the other
hand, a revival of interest in theoretical work on the left and a recognition of the need to confront
the ideology enshrined in orthodox academic disciplines. The Radical Philosophy Group has always
contended that these two problems can be tackled together – that philosophical inquiry into
.f~damenta~ issues must lead to the exposure of conservatism masquerading as formal reason.

Academic philosophy in this country has generally accepted and defended the frame of reference of the
dominant bourgeois culture. This culture is supported and mirrored by the elitist isolation, the
internal hierarchies and demarcations, of academic institutions. The Radical Philosophy Group
therefore works for reforms in courses and assessments, for the enlargement of ‘students’ control over
their education, for the breaking down of barriers between philosophy and other disciplines and
between academic institutions and the outside world.

The Group has held several conferences, and local groups have been formed which have organised
meetings and agitated on local issues. Radical Philosophy is the magazine of the Radical Philosophy
Group, and has come out three times a year since January 1972. It aims to criticise the current
state of philosophy in the English-speaking world and to encourage philosophical discussion on the
left, and welcomes any contributions which will serve these aims.

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