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2 Contents Page

RADIEAL PHI050PHY 2
[antents

SUMMER 1972

NOTES
24

A REACTION TO RADICAL PHIWSOPHY

J.M. Hinton
THE STATIST CONCEPTION OF POLITICS

2
HINTON’S REACTION: A REPLY • • • • . • • • . • • • . • •

Tony Skillen
PHIWSOPHY IN THE ACADEMY

24

& Tony Skillen

Sean Sayers
7

J.M. Cohen

SANITY, MADNESS AND THE PROBLEM OF IGNORANCE . • . . • .

25

Martin Skelton-Robinson
THE PROBLEMS OF LIVING IN AN INTERPRETED WORLD . . . . .

Colin

9

REVIEWS

~1acCabe

THE THEORY OF IDEOWGY IN CAPITAL

12

John Mepham

VESEY DOES IT!

. . . . • . • . . . . . . . • . • . . • •

26

Jonathan Ree

CRITIQUE OF PURE MURDER

20

Michael O’Donoghue

VALIDITY AND IDEOWGY

…•.•…•••.••.•

27

Ian Birkstead

SOCIAL AND PHIWSOPHICAL UNDERSTANDING – AN EXAMPLE

21

John Paley

28

MARXISM: A PHILOSOPHY OF NATURE

G.A. Cohen

REMARKS ON REVOLUTIONARY PERSPECTIVES

23

REPORTS

.••……..•••.•••..•

G.A. Cohen

(Cambridge, Oxford, London Conference, LSE, Dundee)

This issue was edited and produced by: Richard Norman, Sean
Sayers and Tony Skillen.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES: See back cover

Correspondence, contributions and sUbscriptions to:

R.J. Norman, Darwin College, The University, Canterbury, Kent.

The first issue of Radical Philosophy had to be reprinted
to meet the surprising demand. This interest, confirmed by the
attendance at the Discussion Weekend in April (See Report, p.32),
showed that the Group and the journal relate to many people’s
situation and feelings.

But this state of affairs has its dangers: hunger doesn’t
improve the quality of a Walls meat pie. Indeed the very deadness of academic philosophy at this time could foster illusions
about the vitality of the opposition, and generate an accompanying complacency or passive gratitude that “something is being
done”.

As we see it, the central question is whether a real
intellectual movement is developing. This development can be
helped by forming groups and contacts, by starting local duplicated magazine/broadsheets, by rotating the production of this
journal, by establishing further links outside philosophy
departments and outside the academy. But these “relations of
production” will have little point (let alone ontological
status) if the “forces of production” are not operative.

It seems to be widely agreed that we do not aim only at
producing ideas, at criticizing the philosophers’ presentation
of contingent realities and dubious categories as timeless
necessities. This objective is vital, but to confine ourselves
to it would be to reduce ourselves to a kind of left-academicism,
a way of making our own academic lives more comfortable without
discomforting anyone else. That is why we have tried to
emphasise from the start that philosophical ideas are implicit
in the political culture of our society and that these ideas
are produced in institutions which embody and are justified by
them. In these ways, then, the Radical Philosophy Group is
part of a political movement. Our involvement in this kind of
struggle, inside and outside the colleges, marks us off from
being merely a “journal of radical thought”.

31

Designed by Sarah Lutman,
Typed by Miss D. Graham
Published by the Radical Philosophy Group
Printed by the University of Kent Printing Unit

Marxism is not official or unofficial doctrine of the
Radical Philosophy Group; we are explicitly committed to an
“open platform” for radicals. Obviously, however, ideas,
perspectives and problems posed by Marx and by the ~arxist
movement inform much of the group’s outlook and work; and the
sheer task of understanding Marx is vitally importartt. But
it would be absurd if a scholastic orthodoxy were to develop,
overriding the need to confront “incorrect ideas” and their
concrete role in British society, and to come to grips with
the places where we and most of those interested in the Group
and the journal work.

We hope people will continue to send in comments, news
items, quotations, etc., and especially reports of Group
activities, course and exam criticisms and campaigns, etc.

DEADLINES:

RADICAL PHILOSOPHY 3
RADICAL PHILOSOPHY 4

20th August, 1972
15th flovember,1972

Again we apologize for the size of the type. Our present
printer can handle only 36 pages, so we had the choice either
of drastically reducing the material or of keeping the same
format as in the first issue. We decided to do the latter.

However, we are investigating alternative means of printing so
that we can increase the number of pages and hence the size of
the print.

Despite the high sales of the first issue, we have not
yet recovered out costs, due to the fact that we have not
received money for many of the copies sent out on “sale or
return” (sellers please note!). If and when we are in a
better financial position we will expand the size of the
journal. Subscriptions help — please subscribe (see back
cover). The sellers listed on p.33 (or write to us) will sell
the journal to students at the reduced price — bookshops sometimes make difficulties about this.

“Since it is not for us to create a plan for the future that will hold for all
time, all the more surely what we contemporaries have to do is the uncomprising
critical evaluation of all that exists,uncompromising in the sense that our criticism
fears neither its own results nor the conflict with the powers that be …

“Therefore, we can express the aim of our periodical in one phrase: A selfunderstanding (critical philosophy) of the age concerning its-struggles and wishes.”

(Marx)

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