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24 Contents Page

CONTENTS

Editorial

Should We Defend Philosophy? ——————— — –

1

The ‘New Philosophers’ and the End of Leftism ———- Peter Dews

2

Forces of Production and Relations of Production in —— Sean Sayers
Socialist Society

12

Anarchism and Private Property ——————— Derek Browne

19

REVIEWS
Books received —- — — – — – —- —— —– – — — — — – ———– — – —— — — – – – – – – – – – – –

26

Barash: Sociobiology and Behavior
Clutton-Brock & Harvey: Readings in Sociobiology
Mackenzie: Biological Instincts in Politics
Midgley: Beast and Man
Wilson: On Human Nature —————————————————— Martin Barker

27

Lecourt: The Case of Lysenko —————————————————– Ted Benton

30

Olsen: Karl Marx —————————————————————– Pete Stirk

34

Laudan: Progress and its Problems ———————————————— John Krige

35

Smart (eds): Women, Sexuality and Social Control
Byrne: Women and Education ————————————————- Christine Lattek
Totman: Social Causes of Illness ———————————————- Jean Grimshaw

36
37

Goodwin: Social Science and Utopia ——————————————— Martin Barker

37

NEWS AND COMMENT
Obituary of Marcuse ———————————————————- Russell Jacoby

39

Politics and the Production of Theoretical Journals ——————————— Jonathap Ree

40

Edited by: Madan Sarup, Russell Keat, Martin
Barker, David Murray, John Krige, Chris Arthur
Roy Edgley Mike Erben, Noel Parker, Jonathan
Ree, Joe McCarney, Richard Norman,
Ted Benton, Rip Bulkeley, Roger
Waterhouse, Kate Soper,

Typing by Jo Foster
Sub-heads by Bread n’ Roses
Design by David Murray
Printing by Spiderweb
Bookshop distribution by PDC, 27 Clerkenwell Close
London EC1 (tel: 01-251 4976)

THE RADICAL PHILOSO PHY GROUP
The Radical Philosophy Group grew out of a convergence of two currents whic had been largely formed by
the student move.ment of the 1960s – on the one hand, discontent, especially among students, with the sterile
and complacent philosophy taught in British universities and colleges; on the other hand, a revival of interest
in the theoretical work on the left and a recognition of the need to confront the ideology enshrined in orthodox
acade.mic disciplines. The Radical Philosophy Group has always contended that these two problems can be
tackled together – that philosophical inquiry into fundamental issues must lead to the exposure of conservatis m
masquerading as formal reason.

Academic philosophy in this country has generally accepted and defended the frame of reference of the
dominant bourgeois culture. This culture is supported and mirrored by the elitist isolation, the internal
hierarchies and demarcations, of academic institutions. The Radical Philosophy Group therefore works for
reforms in courses and assessments for the enlargement of students’ control over their education, for the
breaking down of barriers between philosophy and other disCiplines and between academic institutions and
the outside world.

The Group has held several conferences, and local groups have been formed which have organised meetings
and agitated on local issues. Radical Philosophy is the magazine of the Radical Philosophy Group, and has
come out three times a year since January 1972. It aims to criticise the current state of philosophy in the
English-speaking world and to encourage philosophical discussion on the left, and welcomes any
contributions which will serve these aims.

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