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25 Contents Page

CONTENTS
Editorial: Cold War Thinking ————————————– – -. – – – – – – – – Ideology and Commonsense: The Case of
British Conservatism ————————– Robert Eccleshall ————-Heidegger’s Early Development ——————- Roger Waterhouse ————-Socialization and the Self: Critique of Berger/Goffman–Jean Grimshaw ————Why Habermas? ———————————– Linda Nicholson — — – – – — – – Lacan: A Reply to Ree —————————- Antony Easthope – – — – – – — – —

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Bahro: The Alternative ———————————————————– Greg Claeys
Derrida: Writing and Difference ————————————————Hugh Tomlinson
Sayer: Marx’s Method ———————————————————– Roy Bhaskar
Sampson: Liberty and Language ————————————————– Russell Keat
Kainz: The Unbinding of Prometheus + Ethica Dialectica —————————— Pete Stirk
McCarthy: The Critical Theory of Jtirgen Habermas
Habermas: Communication and the Evolution of Society —————————– Russell Keat
Paplneau: For Science in the Social Sciences ——————————— Christine Loveland
Biologism Day School ———————————————————– Russell Keat
Theory and Practice in Education ————————————————— Jon Nixon
Books received ——————————————————————————

Edited by: Madan Sarup, Russell Keat, Martin
Barker, John Krige, Chris Arthur, Tony Skill en
Roy Edgley, Mike Erben, Noel Parker, Jonathan
Ree, Joe McCarney, Richard Norman, Alison
Assiter, Ted Benton, Rip Bulkeley, Roger
Waterhouse, Kate Soper,
Typing by J 0 Foster
Sub-heads by Bread n’ Roses
Design by David Murray
Printing by Spiderweb
Bookshop distribution by PDC, 27 Clerkenwell Close
London EC1 (tel: 01-251 4976)

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RP DAY SCHOOL
PROBLEMS OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND
SOCIALISM
Manchester University Union, Oxford Rd., Ma.

10.30 – 16.30, Saturday 21 June
details from Noel Parker r/o RP ed, ad:ress

THE RADICAL PHILOSO PHY GROUP
The Radical Philosophy Group grew out of a convergence of two currents whic had been largely formed. by
the student .move.ment of the 1960s – on the one hand, discontent, especially among students, with the sterile
and complacent philosophy taught in British universities and colleges; on the other hand, a revival of interest
in the theoretical work on the left and a recognition of the need to confront the ideology enshrined in orthodox
academic disciplines. The Radical Philosophy Group has always contended that these two problems can be
tackled together – that philosophical inquiry into fundamental issues must lead to the exposure of conservatis m
masquerading as formal reason.

Acade.mic philosophy in this country has generally accepted and defended the fra.me of reference of the
dominant bourgeois culture. This culture is supported and mirrored by the elitist isolation, the internal
hierarchies and demarcations, of academic institutions. The Radical Philosophy Group therefore works for
reforms in courses and assessments for the enlargement of students’ control over their education, for the
breaking down of barriers between philosophy and other diSCiplines and between academic institutions and
the outside world.

The Group has held several conferences, and local groups have been formed which have organised meetings
and agitated on local issues. Radical Philosophy is the magazine of the Radical Philosophy Group, and has
co.me out three times a year since January 1972. It aims to criticise the current state of philosophy in the
English-speaking world and to encourage philosophical discussion on the left, and welco.mes any
contributions which will serve these aims.

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