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29 Contents Page

CONTENTS
Comment: Racism – a Problem for Thought
and Action

Martin Bark8r and

ARTICLES
Nuclear Disarmament: Democracy and Internationalism
Scientific Realism and the Human World:

the case of psychoanalysis
Introduction to Georges Canguilhem
What is Scientific Ideology? – text
REVIEWS
Okin: Women in Western Political Thought
Jones: Social Darwinism and English Thought
Brighton Women and Science Group: Alice Through the
Microscope
Easlea: Witch-Hunting, Magic and the New Philosophy
Hain et al: The Politicisation of the Police
Sluga: Gottlob Frege
Curti: Human Nature in American Thought
Gaukroger: Explanatory Structures
Fischer: Economy and Self
Hardin: Prom~thean Ethics
Labica: MarxIsm and the Status of Philosophy
Grassi: Rhetoric as Philosophy
NEWS
Co-ordinating Left-wing Intellectuals
Education and Oppression Day-school
Literature Teaching Politics
Canadian Radical Philosophy Group

Parker

1

Martin H. Ryle

2

Andrew Collier

8

Mike Shortland
Georges Canguilhem

19
2 ~J

John Krige
Martin Barker

25
26

John Krige
John Krige
John Krige
tvIike Shortland
Hilary Dowber
Mike Short land
Chris Arthur
Peter Goodrich
Gregory Claeys
Peter Goodrich

2~

~oel

Noel Parker and Roy Edgley
Noel Parker
Andrew Be1sey
Danny Goldstick

CORRESPONDENCE

29
31
32
32
3.’)

36
36
37
38

39
39
41
41
42

THE RADICAL PHILOSOPHY GROUP
The Radical Philosophy Group grew out of a convergence of two C:lrrents which had been
largely formed by the student movement of the 1960s – on the one hand, discontent,
especially among students, with the sterile and compacent philosophy taught in British
universities and colleges; on the other hand, a revival of interest in the theoretical
work of the left and a recognition of the need to confront the ideology enshrined in
orthodox academic disciplines. The Radical Philosophy Group has always contended that
these two problems can be tackled together – that philosophical inquiry into fundamental
issues must lead to the exposure of conservatism masquerading as formal reason.

Academic philosophy in this country has generally accepted and defended the frame of
reference of the dominant bourgeois culture. This culture is supported and mirrored by
the elitist isolation, the internal hierarchies and demarcations, of academic institutions.

The Radical Philosophy Group therefore works for reforms in courses and assessments for
the enlargement of students’ control over their education, for the breaking down of
barriers between philosophy and other disciplines and between academic institutions and
the outside world.

The Group has held numerous conferences, and local groups have been formed which have
organised meetings and agitated on local issues. Radical Philosophy is the magazine of
the Radical Philosophy Group, and has come out three times a year since January 1972.

It aims to criticise the current state of philosophy in the English-speaking world and
to encourage philosophical discussion on the left. It welcomes any contributions which
will serve these aims.

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