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44 Contents

CONTENTS
EDITORIAL: Simone de Beauvoir ………………………………………………………………………………………………..

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ARTICLES
Proletarian Philosophy: A Version of Pastoral? ………………………………………………………………… Jonathan Ree
Lyotard and the Politics of Antifoundationalism …………………………………………………………………… Stuart Sim
Marx’s ‘Social Revolution’ and the Division of Labour ……………………………………………………… Istvan Meszaros
Civil Disobedience and Nuclear Protest: A Reply to Dworkin ………………………………………………. Richard Norman

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COMMENT
Strange Days for Philosophers ………….. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Geoffrey Thomas

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REVIEWS
Jonathan Ree, Proletarian Philosophers ……………………………………………………………………….. Peter Osborne
Sean Sayers, Reality and Reason …………………………………………………………………………… Joseph McCarney
Marshall Blonsky (ed.), On Signs ………………………………………………………………………………. Stephen Heath
Anthony O’Hear, What Philosophy Is ……………………………………………………………………….. John R. Gibbins
Steven Lukes, Marxism and Morality …………………………………………………………………………….. Sean Sayers
Charles Bernheimer and Claire Kahane (ed.), In Dora’s Case; Peregrine Horden (ed.),
Freud and the Humanities ………………………………………………………………………………………. Dave Archard
Anthony Arblaster, The Rise and Decline of Western Liberalism ……………………………………………… Peter Morriss
R.G. Frey, Rights, Killing, and Suffering; S.R.L. Clark, The Moral Status ofAnimals …………………… Mike Singleton
GordonGraham,PoliticsinitsPlace …………………………………………………………………………… AndyDobson
Jean-Paul Sartre, The Freud Scenario …………………………………………………………………………. Dave Archard
SheilaJetTrey, TheSpinsterandHerEnemies ……………………………………………………………….. MargaretAtack
Edward Timms and David Kelley (eds) , Unreal City ……………………………………………………………. Jan Golinski
James Schmidt, Maurice Merleau-Ponty ………………………………………………………………. Graham B. McBeath
Michael Tooley, Abortion and Infanticide ………………………………………………………………….. Richard Edwards
Eugene Lunn, Marxism and Modernism ……………………………………………………………………….. Lloyd Spencer
Anne Wiltsher, Most Dangerous Women …………………………………………………………………….. Margaret Atack
Richard Schacht, Nietzsche ………………………………………………………………………………………. Jonathan Ree
Tony Judt, Marxism and the French Left ……………………………………………………………………….. David Macey
Henry Staten, Wittgenstein and Derrida ……………………………………………………………………….. Paul Crowther
Jean-Jacques Lecercle, Philosophy Through the Looking-Glass ………………………………………………. David Macey
NEWS ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

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RADICAL PHILOSOPHY GROUP
The Radical Philosophy Group grew out of a convergence of two currents which had been largely formed by the student
movement of the 1960s – on the one hand, discontent, especially among students, with the sterile and complacent philosophy
taught in British universities and colleges; on the other hand, a revival of interest in the theoretical work of the left and a
recognition of the need to confront the ideology enshrined in orthodox academic disciplines. The Radical Philosophy Group
has always contended that these two problems can be tackled together – that philosophical inquiry into fundamental issues
must lead to the exposure of conservatism masquerading as formal reason.

Academic philosophy in this country has generally accepted and defended the frame of reference of the dominant bourgeois
culture. This culture is supported and mirrored by the elitist isolation, the internal hierarchies and demarcations, of academic
institutions. The Radical Philosophy Group therefore works for reforms in courses and assessments for the enlargement of
student’s control over their education, for the breaking down of barriers between philosophy and other disciplines and between
academic institutions and the outside world.

The Group has held numerous conferences, and local groups have been formed which have organised meetings and agitated on
local issues. Radical Philosophy is the magazine of the Radical Philosophy Group, and has come out three times a year since
January 1972. It aims to criticise the current state of philosophy in the English-speaking world and to encourage philosophical
discussion on the left. It welcomes any contributions which will serve these aims.

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