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CONTENTS
EDITORIAL: ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… StuartSim

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ARTICLES
The Frankfurt School and the Problem of Critique: A Reply to McCarney ……………………………………… Peter Osborne
Peter Dews
Socialism and Democracy: Beyond State and Civil Society. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Roger Harris
From Virginia WoolftothePost-Moderns: Developments in a Feminist Aesthetic …………………………….. PaulineJohnson
The Question ‘Why Do I Do Philosophy?’ …………………………………………………………………………… James Grant

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REVIEWS
Ernst Bloch, The Principle ofHope ………………………………………………………………………….. Vincent Geoghegan
Kate Soper, Humanism and Anti-Humanism. … . . . . . . . . .. . .. … . .. . . . . . .. . . .. . . . … . . . … . . .. . . . … … . . .. .. . . .. . .. .. . . … .. .. Noel Parker
Kate Soper, Humanism and Anti-Humanism. .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . …. . . .. . .. . .. .. . …. . .. … .. . … .. .. … . .. . . . . . . .. Richard Edwards
Evelyn Fox Keller, Reflections on Gender and Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kathryn Russell
G. W. F. Hegel, The Philosophical Propaedeutic …………………………………………………………………….. Sean Sayers
Dick Howard, From Marx to Kant ………………………………………………………………………… Keith Ansell-Pearson
Hilary Lawson, Reflexivity: The Post-Modern
Predicament; The Second of January group, After Truth. . . … . . .. . . . . . . .. . . .. . . .. .. . . . .. . . . .. . .. . . … . . . . .. . . .. … . . . . .. … David Macey
Norman Jacobson, Pride and Solace. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Sean Sayers
Gabriele Taylor, Pride, Shame and Guilt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sebastian Gardner
Janine Chasseguet-Smirgel and Bela
Grunberger, Freud or Reich? ………………………………………………………………………………………. David Macey
Susan Oyama, The Ontogeny ofInformation . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . … . . . . . . . . . .. . . … .. . . .. .. . . .. . . .. … .. .. .. .. .. .. . . . .. .. . . . .. Martin Barker
John A. Hall (ed), Rediscoveries ……………………………………………………………………………… Gregor McLennan
Susanne Kappeler, Pornography ofRepresentation …… . .. . . .. .. . . .. .. . . . . . . .. .. . . .. .. . . … . . . … . . .. .. . . .. .. . .. . . …. Graham McCann
Frank O’Gorman, British Conservatism; Robert
Eccleshall, British Liberalism ……………………………………………………………………………………… Andy Dobson
ICA Documents, Postmodernism .. . . . . … . . . . .. . . . . .. . … .. . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . … . . . .. . .. .. … . .. .. . . … … . .. .. . . . . . .. Gregor McLennan
C. Taylor, PhilosphicalPapers(2 vols) ……………………………………………………………………………… PeterVipond
W. A. Suchting, Marx and Philosophy. .. . . . . .. .. . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . .. .. . … . . .. .. . . .. .. . . .. . . . . . .. . . .. .. . . . . .. . .. . . . .. . . . . . .. C. J. Arthur
J. G. Merquior, From Prague to Paris ……………………………………………………………………………… DavidMacey
E. M. Wood, The Retreat from Class. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . .. . . .. . . . . . . .. .. .. . . . .. . . . … .. . . .. . .. . . .. . . . . . .. . . .. Richard Edwards
Christopher Norris, Contest ofFaculties. ……………………………………………………………………………… Stuart Sim
Michel de Certeau, Heterologies. .. .. . . . .. . . . . .. .. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . .. .. . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . .. . . . . .. … . … .. . . .. . .. . . .. . . . . .. . .. David Macey
Paul Ricoeur, Time and Narrative. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J onathan Ree
Bob Fine, Democracy and the Rule ofLaw ………………………………………………………………………….. C. J. Arthur
Fred d’ Agostino, Chomsky’s System ofIdeas . .. . . .. . . .. . .. . . . … . . .. .. . . .. . . .. . . . . .. .. . . . .. .. . … .. . … . .. . . .. . . . . . .. . . . … … David Macey
David Frisby, Fragments of Modernity ………………………………………………………………………….. Chris Rojek

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RADICAL PHILOSOPHY GROUP
The Radical Philosophy Group grew out of a convergence of two currents which had been largely formed by the student
movement of the 1960s – on the one hand, discontent, especially among students, with the sterile and complacent philosophy
taught in British universities and colleges; on the other hand, a revival of interest in the theoretical work of the left and a
recognition of the need to confront the ideology enshrined in orthodox academic disciplines. The Radical Philosophy Group
has always contended that these two problems can be tackled together – that philosophical inquiry into fundamental issues
must lead to the exposure of conservatism masquerading as formal reason.

Academic philosophy in this country has generally accepted and defended the frame of reference of the dominant bourgeois
culture. This culture is supported and mirrored by the elitist isolation, the internal hierarchies and demarcations, of academic
institutions. The Radical Philosophy Group therefore works for reforms in courses and assessments for the enlargement of
student’s control over their education, for the breaking down of barriers between philosophy and other disciplines and between
academic institutions and the outside world.

The Group has held numerous conferences, and local groups have been formed which have organised meetings and agitated on
local issues. Radical Philosophy is the magazine of the Radical Philosophy Group, and has come out three times a year since
January 1972. It aims to criticise the current state of philosophy in the English-speaking world and to encourage philosophical
discussion on the left. It welcomes any contributions which will serve these aims.

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