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47 Contents Page

CONTENTS
EDITORIAL ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. Sean Sayers

1

Feminism and the Logic of Morality: A Consideration of Alternatives ……………………………………………… Susan Parsons
Beyond Objectivism and Relativism ……………………………………………………………………………………………. Ingvar Johansson
Philosophy and Aggression ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. Jean Grimshaw
The Politics of Fulfilment and Transfiguration ………………………………………………………………………………… J.M. Bemstein
Place and Time in Socialist Theory ………………………………………………………………………………………………… Michael Rustin

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REVIEWS
Stephen Houlgate, Hegel, Nietzsche and the Criticism of Metaphysics ……………………………………………………… R.A. Stem
Jean Grimshaw, Feminist Philosophers: Women’s Perspectives on Philosophical Traditions …………. Kathleeen Lennon
Raymond Boudon, Theories of Social Change: A Critical Appraisal ……………………………………………………… Noel Parker
Christopher Pierson, Marxist Theory and Democratic Politics …………………………………………………………. Gregory Claeys
Krishan Kumar, Utopia and Anti-Utopia in Modern Times ………………………………………………………… Vincent Geoghegan
Duncan K. Foley, Understanding Capital: Marx’s Economic Theory …………………………………………………….. Chris Arthur
Derek Gjertsen, The Newton Handbook ……………………………………………………………………………………………. Jan Golinski
Michael Mann, The Sources of Social Power ……………………………………………………………………………………. Paul Bagguley
J. Borreil (Ed.),
Les Sauvages dans la cite: Auto emancipation du peuple et instruction des prolitaires au 1geme siecle …….. Noel Parker

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NEWS ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 45
LETIERS ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 47

RADICAL PHILOSOPHY GROUP
The Radical Philosophy Group grew out of a convergence of two currents which had been largely formed
by the student movement of the 1960s-on the one hand, discontent, especially among students, with the
sterile and complacent philosphy taught in British universities and colleges; on the other hand, a revival of
interest in the theoretical work of the left and a recognition of the need to confront the ideology enshrined
in orthodox academic disciplines. The Radical Philosophy Group has always contended that these two
problems can be tackled together – that philosophical inquiry into fundamental issues must lead to the
exposure of conservatism masquerading as formal reason.

Academic philosophy in this country has generally accepted and defended the frame of reference of the
dominant bourgeois culture. This culture is supported and mirrored by the elitist isolation, the internal
hierarchies and demarcations, of academic institutions. The Radical Philosophy Group therefore works
for reforms in courses and assessments for the enlargement of student’s control over their education, for
the breaking down of barriers between philosophy and other disciplines and between academic
institutions and the outside world.

The Group has held numerous conferences, and local groups have been formed which have organised
meetings and agitated on local issues. Radical Philosophy is the magazine of the Radical Philosophy
Group, and has come out three times a year since January 1972. It aims to criticise the current state of
philosophy in the English-speaking world and to encourage philosophical discussion on the left. It
welcomes any contributions which will serve these aims.

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