The following text has been automatically reproduced by an Optical Character Recognition (OCR) algorithm. It may not have been checked over by human eyes. For matters of precision please consult the original pdf.

49 Contents

CONTENTS
EDITORIAL …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… Martin Barker
ARTICLES
John Rawls and Human Welfare ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. John Watt
Dull Compulsion of the Economic: The Dominant Ideology and Social Reproduction …………………… Conrad Lodziak
Is Bhaskar’s Realism Realistic? …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. Alan ChaImers
‘Pure Lust’: The Elemental Feminist Philosophy of Mary Daly …………………………………………………….. Jean Grimshaw
‘Svelte Discourse’ and the Philosophy of Caution ………………………………………………………………………………… Stuart Sim
REVIEWS
Laurence Dickey, Hegel: Religion, Economics, and the Politics of Spirit, 1770-1807
David Lamb (ed.), Hegel and Modern Philosophy ……………………………………………………………………………. Peter Osbome
Martin Bernal, The Afroasiatic Roots of Classical Civilisation.

1

3
10

18
24
31

37

Volume 1: The Fabrication ofAncient Greece 1785-1985
Klaus Theweleit, Male Fantasies. Volume 1: Women, floods, bodies, history ………………………………. Vincent Geoghegan
Patricia Smith Churchland, Neurophilosophy: Toward a Unified Science of the Mind/Brain ……………… Dave Archard
Kenneth Baynes, James Bohman and Thomas McCarthy (eds.),
After Philosophy: End or Transformation? …………………………………………………………………………………….. Peter Osbome
Norberto Bobbio, The Future of Democracy: A Defence of the Rules of the Game ……………………….. Gregor McLennan
Brian Rotman, Signifying Nothing: The Semiotics of Zero ……………………………………………………………. Jonathan Powers
Anthony Giddens, The Nation-State and Violence:

Volume Two of A Contemporary Critique of Historical Materialism …………………………………………………….. Noel Parker
Maurice Godelier, The Mental and the Material ………………………………………………………………………… Gregor McLennan
JefT Hearn, The Gender of Oppression: Men Masculinity and the Critique of Marxism ………………………. Paul Bagguley
NEWS
Raymond Williams (1921-1988) ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. Michael Rnstin

RADICAL PHILOSOPHY GROUP
The Radical Philosophy Group grew out of a convergence of two currents which had been largely formed
by the student movement of the 1960s – on the one hand, discontent, especially among students, with the
sterile and complacent philosphy taught in British universities and colleges; on the other hand, a revival of
interest in the theoretical work of the left and a recognition of the need to confront the ideology enshrined
in orthodox academic disciplines. The Radical Philosophy Group has always contended that these two
problems can be tackled together – that philosophical inquiry into fundamental issues must lead to the
exposure of conservatism masquerading as formal reason.

Academic philosophy in this country has generally accepted and defended the frame of reference of the
dominant bourgeois culture. This culture is supported and mirrored by the elitist isolation, the internal
hierarchies and demarcations, of academic institutions. The Radical Philosophy Group therefore works
for reforms in courses and assessments for the enlargement of student’s control over their education, for
the breaking down of barriers between philosophy and other disciplines and between academic
institutions and the outside world.

The Group has held numerous conferences, and local groups have been formed which have organised
meetings and agitated on local issues. Radical Philosophy is the magazine of the Radical Philosophy
Group, and has come out three times a year since January 1972. It aims to criticise the current state of
philosophy in the English-speaking world and to encourage philosophical discussion on the left. It
welcomes any contributions which will serve these aims.

© Radical

p III I DSOPII ‘

39
41
42
43
43
44

45
46

46

Download the PDFBuy the latest issue