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5 Contents Page

[onTEnTS
MENTAL ILLNESS AS A MORAL CONCEPT

2

REVIEWS

Sean Sayers
RAISING THE TONE
TRUTH AND PRACTICE

9

35

Henry Bernstein

Andrew Colier
PIAGET ON STRUCTURALISM
SEARLE’S IDEA OF A UNIVERSITY

17

S.W. Gaukroger

23

Tony Skillen

37

Colwyn Williamson
WADHAM WARDEN WARNS WORLD
THE QUESTION OF HEGEMONY

40

G. Nowell-Smith
MONTESQUIEU & Co.

CLASS, CONSCIOUSNESS, CONTROL, COMMUNICATION • •

25

John Jervis

28

REPORTS
London, Cardiff, Swansea, Radical Historians,
etc . . . .

4.1

Trevor Pateman
A NOTE ON R.S. PETERS

Bob Borsley
THE MARXIST THEORY OF ART

42

29

Roger Taylor

This issue was edited by: John Mepham, Richard
Norman, Jonathan Ree, Sean Sayers, Janet Vaux.

Produced by: Sarah Lutman, Richard Norman,Sean Sayers.

Typed by: Jo Foster, Diane Graham.

Published by the RADICAL PHILOSOPHY GROUP

Contemporary British philosophy is at a dead end.

Its academic practitioners have all out aoandoned the
attempt to understand the world, let alone to change
it. They have made philosophy into a narrow and
specialised academic subject of little relevance or
interest to anyone outside the small circle of
Professional Philosophers.

Many students and teachers are now dissatisfied
with this state of affairs, but so far they have been
isolated. The result has been that serious philosophical work outside the conventional sphere has
been minimal.

The Radical Philosophy Group has been set up to
challenge this situation, by people within philosophy
departments and in other fields of work. We ail.l to
queStion the institutional divisions between academic
departments which have cut philosophers off from the
important philosophical work already being done by
psychologists, sociologists and others; the division
between students and teachers which has divorced
academic philosophy from the radical activity and
ideas of students; and, above all, the divisions
which have isolated the universities and other
educational institutions from the wider society,
thereby narrowing the horizons of philosophical
concern.

As well as exposing the poverty of so much that
now passes for philosophy, we shall aim to understand
its causes. We need to ask whether its barrenness is
the inevitable consequence of its linguistic and
analytic methods as opposed to, for example, their

Correspondence and contributions to:

Jonathan Ree, Middlesex Polytechnic at Hendon,
The Burroughs, Hendon, London NW4 4BT
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: See back cover.

application to trivial “problems”. We shall examine
the historical and institutional roots of recent
British philosophy and investigate its ideological
role within the wider culture.

But we do not want to become exclusively
preoccupied with the inadequacies of this type of
philosophy. Our aim is to encourage and to develop
positive alternatives. For this there are other
traditions which may inform our work (e.g.

phenomenology and existentialism, Hegelian thought
and Marxism). However, the Group will not attempt
to lay down a philosophical line. Our main aim is
to free ourselves from the restricting institutions
and orthodoxies of the academic world, and thereby
to encourage important philosophical work to develop:

Let a Hundred Flowers Blossom!

FOR INFORMATION ABOUT LOCAL ACtIVITIES, CONTACT:

ABERDEEN: Rryan Turner (Soc.Dept.)
BRISTOL: Antoinette Satow (Phil.nept.)
CAMBRIDGE: John , ~ley (King’s)
CANTERBURY: John Thackara (Rutherford)
GLASGOW: Scott Meikle (Dept. of Moral phil.)
CARDIFF: Barry Wilkins (Phil.Dept.)
SWANSEA: nave Lamb (16 Uplands Crescent)
LONDON: Jonathan Ree (Phil.Dept.,Hendon Tec~.)
OXrORD: Janet Vaux (17 Rawlinson Rd.)
YORK: Gerry Kelman, Ian Hills (Goodricke College)
OTHERWISE PLEASE CONTACT:

Sean Sayers, Keynes College, The University,
Canterbury, Kent.

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