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Posts tagged ‘Marxism’

A is for apocalypse

by / RP 186 (Jul/Aug 2014) / Individual Review

David J. Blacker, The Falling Rate of Learning and the Neoliberal Endgame , Zero Books, Winchester and Washington DC, 2013. 319 pp., £15.99 pb., 978 1 78099 578 6.

Amidst the recent flood of lachrymose reports on the neoliberal assault upon education, this book stands out for its unflinching survey of the extent of the …


184 Reviews

Neil Davidson, How Revolutionary Were the Bourgeois Revolutions? Alain Badiou, Cinema George Henderson, Value in Marx: The Persistence of Value in a More-Than-Capitalist World Rosi Braidotti, The Posthuman David Kilcullen, Out of the Mountains: The Coming Age of the Urban Guerrilla Lydia H. Liu, Rebecca E. Karl and Dorothy Ko, eds, The Birth of Chinese Feminism: Essential Texts in Transnational Theory Federico Campagna, The Last Night: Atheism, Anti-work and Adventure Gyanedra Pandey, A History of Prejudice: Race, Caste, and Difference in India and the United States Peter K.J. Park, Africa, Asia, and the History of Philosophy: Racism in the Formation of the Philosophical Canon, 1780–1830 Gilbert Achcar, Marxism, Orientalism, Cosmopolitanism
by , , , , , , , , and / RP 184 (Mar/Apr 2014) / Reviews


A differing shade of green

by / RP 179 (May/Jun 2013) / Individual Review

Adrian Parr, The Wrath of Capital: Neoliberalism and Climate Change Politics, Columbia University Press, New York, 2013. 224 pp., £20.50 hb., 978 0 23115 828 2.

This book is a welcome addition to the spate of recent books on the ecological and resource calamities currently facing the planet. Unlike so many others – one …


Truly Liberating

by / RP 178 (Mar/Apr 2013) / Individual Review

Kevin B. Anderson and Russell Rockwell, eds, The Dunayevskaya-Marcuse-Fromm Correspondence, 1954-1978: Dialogues on Hegel, Marx and Critical Theory, Lexington Books, Lanham MD and Plymouth, 2012, 269 pp., £49.95 hb., £21.95 pb., 978 0 73916 835 6 hb, 978 0 73916 836 3 pb.

Raya Dunayevskaya died in 1987 aged 77, but her ideas remain alive …


Noam Chomsky

Freedom and power
by and / RP 172 (Mar/Apr 2012) / Interview

Peter Hallward I’d like to start by asking you about some of your basic philosophical principles, starting with your understanding of human freedom and creativity. In the modern European tradition I’m most familiar with, freedom is a dominant philosophical theme from Descartes through Rousseau to Kant. With Kant we have an affirmation …


Inside the factory, and out

by / RP 172 (Mar/Apr 2012) / Individual Review

Fredric Jameson, Representing ‘Capital’: A Reading of Volume One, Verso, London and New York, 2011. 158pp., £14.99 hb., 978 1 84467 454 1.

John Kraniauskas

Fredric Jameson’s latest book, published hot on the heels of a monograph on Hegel’s Phenomenology (The Hegel Variations, 2010) and a large collection of essays on the dialectic …


Lenin and Gandhi

A missed encounter?
by / RP 172 (Mar/Apr 2012) / Article

The theme I shall address today has all the trappings of an academic exercise.* Still, I would like to attempt to show how it intersects with several major historical, epistemological and ultimately political questions. As a basis for the discussion, I will posit that Lenin and Gandhi are the two greatest figures among revolutionary theorist–practitioners …


David Macey, 1949-2011

Biographer of the French intellectual Left
by and / RP 171 (Jan/Feb 2012) / Obituary

David Macey died from complications of lung cancer on 7 October. He embodied the paradox of being a fine public intellectual while remaining an intenselyprivate person. He was one of the best intellectual historians of his generation and added appreciably to scholarly knowledge, yet did his most significant work as a freelance writer …


Why Keynes was wrong

by / RP 171 (Jan/Feb 2012) / Individual Review

Terry Eagleton, Why Marx Was Right, Yale University Press, New Haven CT, 2011. 258 pp., £16.99 hb., 978 0 30016 943 0.

Paul Mattick, Business As Usual: The Economic Crisis and the Failure of Capitalism, Reaktion Books, London, 2011. 126 pp. £12.95 pb., 978 1 86189 801 2.

Stephen Harper

In 2008, as …


Theory (Madness of)

From structure to rhizome: transdisciplinarity in French thought (2)
by / RP 167 (May/Jun 2011) / Article, Dossier, From structure to rhizome: transdisciplinarity in French thought

Forty years or so after it initially rose as a rather new name for a rather new thing, theory is still an obtruse signifier, troubling and floating, requiring we go back to basics. Theory as we most often understand it today is the name given by the English-speaking intellectual community to a certain …


Between sharing and antagonism

The invention of communism in the early Marx
by / RP 166 (Mar/Apr 2011) / Article

London calling

Why talk about communism today?* A first point everybody will be agreed upon: the spectre of communism is not haunting Europe, nor for that matter any other region of the world. The only place where ‘communism’ is a positive name for anything is China, where it designates the ruling party of one of …


Structure: method or subversion of the social sciences?

From structure to rhizome: transdisciplinarity in French thought (1)
by / RP 165 (Jan/Feb 2011) / Article, Dossier, From structure to rhizome: transdisciplinarity in French thought

It seems there’s no longer any real doubt as to the answer to this question, and that it is doubly negative. ‘Structuralism’, or what was designated as such mainly in France in the 1960s and 1970s (setting aside the question of other uses), is no longer regarded as a truly fertile …


Who needs postcoloniality?

A reply to Lindner
by / RP 164 (Nov/Dec 2010) / Article

In Marx’s articles for the New York Tribune on British colonialism in India and the events leading to the Second Anglo-Chinese War (Opium War), critics have caught sight of a double mission attributed by him to British imperialism and colonialism to tear down the structure of archaic societies and lay the …


Marxism and war

by / RP 160 (Mar/Apr 2010) / Article

War for Marxism is not exactly a concept, but it is certainly a problem.* While Marxism could not invent a concept of war, it could re-create it, so to speak – that is, introduce the question of war into its own problematic, and produce a Marxist critiqueof war, or a critical theory of warfare, war …


Rem Koolhaas and Reinier de Graaf

Propaganda architecture
by , , and / RP 154 (Mar/Apr 2009) / Interview


Non-traduttore, traditore?

Notes on postwar European Marxisms
by / RP 152 (Nov/Dec 2008) / Article


Orientalism in reverse

by / RP 151 (Sep/Oct 2008) / Article


International Conference on Contemporary Capitalism Studies, Changshu, November 2006

by / RP 142 (Mar/Apr 2007) / Conference Report


Brian Ferneyhough/Charles Bernstein, Shadowtime, Prinzregententheater, Munich, 25 May 2004

by / RP 127 (Sep/Oct 2004) / Reviews


Politics, Subjectivity, Event: A Workshop with Antonio Negri on his book Time for Revolution, Birkbeck College, University of London, 25 June; Antonio Negri in Conversation, Institute of Contemporary Arts, London, 26 June

by / RP 127 (Sep/Oct 2004) / Conference Report