Looting the university

The recent campaign at the University of Sussex against the outsourcing of 235 non-academic jobs has confronted certain organizational and ideological limitations of the struggles in higher education so far. It constitutes an escalation of the anti-privatization movement in the UK. Porters, security, catering, maintenance, and other non-academic staff at the university face their employment […]

Who let the dogs out?

Universities Who let the dogs out? The privatization of higher education Andrew mcgettigan In April last year, I framed my article on ‘New Providers’ in relation to the delay surrounding the publication of the government’s White Paper for Higher Education (HE). That was caused by a combination of factors, but chiefly the need to fix […]

Of course… however

Michael Bailey and Des Freedman, eds, The Assault on Universities: A Manifesto for Resistance, Pluto Press, London, 2011. 200 pp., £14.99 pb., 978 0 74533 191 1. Matthew Charles The conceptual poles that orient the collection of essays edited by Des Freedman and Michael Bailey in The Assault on Universities are, on the one hand, […]

The Chilean winter

tunnel, between social movements everywhere. Wormholes complete the encounter, transmit messenger particles that unite all struggles across the planet. Charged particles transmit negative, repulsive energy, frequently saying to other particles ‘move apart’; yet every particle also has an opposite charge, has powers of attractions that say ‘come together’. In our contemporary, ever-expanding urban universe, little […]

Student problems (1964)

Dossier Thealthusser–Rancière Controversy Introduction to Althusser’s ‘Student Problems’ Warren montag For those familiar with Louis Althusser’s published work, reading his relatively early essay entitled ‘Student Problems’ may be a surprising and even disconcerting experience. Part of the surprise lies in the fact that the essay exists at all. Although it was published in Nouvelle Critique […]

Devolving public universities

Universities Devolving public universities Lessons from America Christopher newfield It is easy enough to be fatalistic about the current funding situation in higher education. US public universities have locked themselves into a model that has led to the slashing of public funding off and on for thirty years and that has been forcing public universities […]

Victory At Swansea

NEWS VICTORY AT SWANSEA Visitor’s Report Reinstates Rebel Lecturers The three lecturers at the centre of the long-running row over academic standards in the Philosophy Department at University College, Swansea are to be reinstated, following the publication of a 173-page report on the affair by retired High Court judge Sir Michael Davies. Two years after […]

A’ Level Philosophy; The Church Is In Danger

LETTERS ‘A’ LEVEL PHILOSOPHY Dear RP, Steve Brigley (RP 35) was pessimistic about the ‘A’ level Philosophy syllabus proposed by the AEB. His main concern was its failure to provide opportunities for the development of students’ own ideas and arguments, suggesting that the syllabus was likely to reproduce the elitism and obscurity which graces the […]

The ‘A’ Level Canon

The’A’LeveICanon Sally Minogue [This is a slightly revised version of a paper delivered at the Conference for Higher Education Teachers of English at the University of Kent, Easter 1987.] I want to begin by saying something about the institutionalisation of English in education, and we don’t need to look far for images of this institutionalisation. […]

Eduction for Industry

that needs to be put into question. For Althusser only repeats in Spinozist form the operation which is common to all epistemological theories of demarcation of science from other kinds of theoretical discourse. That is, to attempt to provide a philosophical justification for a particular social selection and hierarchical distribution of theoretical discourses, a certain […]

Thought and Action in the Huntingdon Affair

ana Action ‘in the Huntinglon Affair I’nedom of Speech and Acaclamlc ….eedom Thought RoyEdgley ,. In Summer 1973 a group of students at Sussex University prevented Samuel P. Huntington, an American professor, from giving an academic lecture (see centre pages of RP7). They objected to his having played the par~f a ~new mandarin~ in the […]

Philosophy in the Academy

PHILOSOPHY mTHE A[ADRY J.m.[ahen The following polemic began life as a reaction to the frustrations of various discussions with professional philosophers of issues that are central to the radical transformation of social relationships from alienated and oppressive ones to free, equal-socialist-social relations. It is addressed primarily to people in or near to the movement, and […]

Examinations and Academic Illiteracy; Philosophy and the World

Now it does seem to me that Norman does trade on this “rationalist” view in his discussion of Tolstoy. For he does say “Andrew’s ‘discovery’ is in each case”‘the acquisition of an enlarged and clearer view of human nature and of man’s relation to the world” (p.9) “The ‘way of seeing the world’ (the “religious […]

Who are my peers?

2 Commentary Who are my peers? The Research Assessment Exercise in Philosophy Sean sayers British universities have just gone through their third Research Assessment Exercise (RAE). The ʻresearch outputʼ (i.e. publications) of every participating department has been graded by panels of ʻexpertsʼ on a seven-point scale. The purpose of this massive operation is to provide […]

Dictating research: Feminist philosophy and the RAE; The case of economics

News Dictating researchFeminist philosophy and the RAEIn an essentially contested subject such as philosophy, it makes little sense for a small Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) Panel to make judgements across the whole breadth of the discipline, however well-intentioned that panel might be. As I work between the ʻcontinentalʼ and ʻanalyticalʼ traditions – in the field […]

Dearing Boring

Commentary Dearing Boring: The massification of higher education Roger harris My heart has been sinking as RPʼs deadline approached and the Dearing debate, on which I rashly agreed to write, has guttered rather than blazed. Commentaries are now plentiful and repetitive. Across the spectrum flags have long been nailed to their respective masts. Drafts I […]

Women philosophers and the RAE

News Women philosophers and the RAEThe Society for Women in Philosophy (SWIP) is an organization which attempts to reflect and represent the views and interests of women working in all fields and all traditions of philosophical inquiry. It also supports the publication of the Womenʼs Philosophy Review, which provides the only British forum for the […]

Compulsory downshifting

News Compulsory downshiftingThe landmark case of the Open University v. its part-time staff is grinding its way through the courts towards likely victory for the associate staff on pro-rata fulltime employment benefits. Whilst this highlights a particularly bad case of handme-down employment conditions in the HE sector (one recent estimate puts pay at £8.00 per […]

Strategies for language?

News Strategies for language? Being a modern linguist is a pretty rotten business. Applications to study modern languages in UK universities have fallen by over a third in the last decade. Whilst Spanish and to a lesser extent Italian have fared reasonably well, other languages are in rapid decline. University applications have directly reflected falling […]